Shadowness - MISTERTRECE http://shadowness.com COFFEE+CIGARETTES+VIOLENCE+LOUD MUSIC+AEROSOL SPRAY+DARKNESS+HORROR MOVIES+TATTOOS+CHAOS+PARANORMAL STUFF+FIRE+COFFEE+COFFEEE = 13. OFFICIAL: ALL M... en FEAR IS THE LIAR - POST MORTEM VISIONS http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/fear-is-the-liar--post-mortem-visions <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/fear-is-the-liar--post-mortem-visions"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/433104/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Fear Is The Liar is one of my music side projects i was working the last months, influenced by the Spiritisim world and history. You´ll find slow, atmospheric, ethereal and emotive 10 songs turned into ghosts, ouija, haunted places, the weird noises you heard every night.... Now yo can find it on Bandcamp. Hope you´ll enjoy it as i did making it. I played it all, i recorded it all and i made my own merchandising too. You can listen and download the songs here fearistheliar.bandcamp.com/rel… I had the honor of to have the help from one of the most kindness and amazing metalhead ever, my sister Nina ninalovesmetal.deviantart.com/ who made a special photo session for the cover and the artwork for the album. Please take a look to her gallery, is full of amazing pics. Thank you again my sister, you´re so fucking GREAT. I cant express with words my gratitude for your amazing help. Track list: 01- Fox Sister (Intro). 02 - Imago Mortis. 03 - Death Talkers. 04 - See You In The Other Side. 05 - B.I.B.L.E. ( Basic Instruction Before Leave Earth). 06 - Orbs ( Interlude) 07 - Post Mortem Visions. 08 - Thanatophobia. 09 - We´re The Darkest Night. 10 - Hereafter ( Outro). Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:24:22 -0400 THE DARK AMONG US http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/the-dark-among-us <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/the-dark-among-us"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/433101/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray, kleenex and ashes of cigarette on canvas, 2 coffee 2 cigarette. PLEASE LISTEN TO THIS SONG WATCHING THE IMAGE AND READING THE TEXT FOR TO CATCH THE VIBE soundcloud.com/mistertrece/mis… The amazing Esther Witchouse wrote this poem for the work, so is so fucking cool because she´s one of my fav artists here. PLEASE check her gallery, you´ll find a unique, dark and creative art witchouse.deviantart.com/ Thank you so much, you know how i love all about you!! IN THE COLD Look at him, all painted up. The gates to hell wish him luck. Instead he's painted a smile well. Now he's dead so ring the bells. Ring around the rosie rotting slow, in the coffin he rests below. So smile bright, they see right through the dark rusted gates guide you to. They left him cold, his mother and father, Their sons love they never did bother. Now he rests in the cold and his soul will roam and never grow old. Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:22:22 -0400 INCOGNITO http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/incognito-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/incognito-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/css/text-censored.png" /></a><br />Aerosol spray, kleenex and ashes of cigarette on canvas, 2 coffee, 3 cigarettes. PLEASE LISTEN TO THIS SONG WATCHING THE IMAGE AND READING THE TEXT FOR TO CATCH THE VIBE: soundcloud.com/mistertrece/mis… The soul is the name given to the supposed immaterial part of an individual, which some believe can exist separately from the body in the afterlife. Though the term itself largely comes from Christian traditions, most religions have some concept of a "part" of the person that is separate and distinct from the body. It's considered by those who believe in it to be a self-evident and intrinsic part of humanity. It is an important aspect of much religious belief—particularly when concerning the afterlife. The term is often invoked in a metaphorical sense (such as a poetic statement "my soul was moved by his words") without implying the actual existence of a separate "magical" part of a person that exists after the person dies. The concept of the soul it is not recognised by science because it is a supernatural explanation of the phenomenon of human consciousness, and as such non-falsifiable. The soul is postulated by believers to be completely immaterial. Scientists who attempt, and without exception fail, to find evidence of the soul will usually be told that they can't measure or characterise it anyway. Like most other spiritual beliefs, this makes the idea of the soul somewhat immune to scrutiny. Those who logically and scientifically argue against a "soul" would state that if something can't be measured or tested -directly or indirectly- in any way, then it can't affect the material world and therefore is, in all practicality and in all actuality, non-existent. The soul is usually described as an immaterial "thing" in a way that implies that it "contains" someone's consciousness, emotions, personality, and memories According to neuroscientific views, the mind, with the components of memories, creativity, beliefs and opinions that form a person's identity, is a component of the functioning brain . During brain death, which is typically bound to occur in as few as 3 minutes after cardiac arrest, all brain function halts permanently. If the soul is a part of the mind, it would cease to exist at brain death. In the scientific context, there is nothing of one's personality that can exist outside of the biological framework which could float off to some happy place, or live a new life, nothing that could live, the "after life". Even setting aside what we know about the human mind and personality, logical questions have always existed regarding the afterlife. "Where is it?" If it is, as many ancient religions suggested, a physical place "above us in the sky" or "deep in the earth" then we would have found such places in human exploration. If it is a place for souls to permanently reside.That's a hell of a lot of space needed for the billions who have come before. And there is the endless debate over who and what have access to such afterlife. The traditional heaven-hell dichotomy was not present in many early religions. The ancient Semitic peoples of the Near East, such as the Babylonians and Canaaites, believed that all the dead go to a shadowy place under the earth regardless of their conduct in life. The ancient Jews shared this belief, although many devout Chirstian Biblical Scholars have attempted to suppress this. The concept of an afterlife is widespread throughout most human religions. One of the important purpose of religious belief is to give explanations of, and reassurances about the world. Humans and other animals fundamentally fear death, it's what keeps us alive long enough to procreate. The idea of simply not existing any longer is also quite upsetting for most people. Afterlife offers hope of again seeing those that have died and a promise of an escape from death and non-existence. In many religions, the idea of an afterlife, especially where it is associated with punishment and reward, is a handy explanation for why we have to suffer in this life. " Dying man couldn’t make up his mind which place to go to — both have their advantages, 'heaven for climate, hell for company!" Mark Twain. Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:18:23 -0400 PHOSPHOROS http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/phosphoros-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/phosphoros-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/433097/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray, kleenex and ashes of cigarettes on canvas, 3 coffee, 2 cigarette. PLEASE LISTEN TO THE SONG WATCHING THE IMAGE AND READING THE TEXT FOR TO CATCH THE VIBE: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LabiiA… Lucifer is another name for Satan. This is because people interpret a passage in the Book of Isaiah of the Bible in a certain way. Lucifer is Latin. It is made of two parts, lux-lucis (light) and ferre (to bring). There are two mentions of Lucifer in the Latin Vulgate. It is used to refer to the morning star, the planet Venus that appears at dawn: once in 2 Peter 1:19 to translate the Greek word "Φωσφόρος" (Phosphoros), which has exactly the same literal meaning of "Light-Bringer" that "Lucifer" has in Latin; and once in Isaiah 14:12 to translate "הילל" (Hêlēl), which also means "Morning Star". Lucifer is "the morning star," the "light bearer," and consort of the Queen of Heaven. His star is Venus, which is, also, associated with Venus the goddess of love and Eros the god of love. In, Charles Godfrey Leland's, "Gospel of Aradia," Lucifer is the brother of Diana and the father of the strega goddess Aradia. Diana was, also, known as Lucifera. In Judeo-Christian mythology, Lucifer is confounded with a Cananite god who struggles against the tyrannical creator "god" and serves as an advocate for mankind that we might possess the knowledge and wisdom of the gods. Later, the Christians further confound Lucifer with Satan (in this case, a man named Helel, a Babylonian King who was an enemy to the Jews) in the King James Version of the Bible. Consequently, modern Christians commonly confuse Lucifer with their Satan, however, Satan to Christians is anyone they don't like or who represents some idea they don't agree with. The term, "Satan," simply means adversary. The Christian Gnostics, regarded as heretical by the early Church of Rome, say Lucifer as either a brother of god or as his elder son who was cast out of heaven. It is interesting to note that the Christian Jesus says he, too, is "the light." Lucifer may be seen as Prometheus, the Greek Titan and trickster who stole fire, which symbolizes illumination or knowledge, to give to mankind so that they would be equal to the gods. He was punished by Zeus for his disobedience. Like Lucifer, he is seen as a champion of humanity against the tyranny of a god who wants to have all of the glory for himself and keep his creation (mankind) in bondage and ignorance. Is a common mistake to think satanism, worshiping Satan and followers of Lucifer, or luciferianism are the same. Luciferianism is not a religion; rather, it is the antithesis of religion. There is no set canon of accepted belief or doctrine in Luciferianism. Most Luciferians are atheists, who do not acknowledge any god or supreme being. Many Luciferians, but not all, practice witchcraft, which is most often regarded as an esoteric science and not a religion. Luciferianism is the pursuit of illumination and knowledge. Most Luciferians are avid readers and researchers. Generally, Luciferianism is not a practice like other types of spiritual "paths;" more often it is simply a philosophy. Although, Lucifer may, also, be regarded as a living spirit. It is possible to hold some aspect of both of these perspectives since there is, throughout the world, a primeval creative intelligence that corresponds with Lucifer. Generally, Lucifer is not worshiped in the sense that this term would be understood by Christians who have a concept of an exalted creator "God" who demands worship, servitude and deference. Lucifer is the antithesis of these ideas. Although, the spirit of Lucifer may be invoked. The concept of Lucifer inspires to dig deeper into life's mysteries to discover the truth about the nature of the world, both physically and metaphysically. To be a Luciferian is to adopt the mental attitude of seeking enlightenment. Lucifer is the inspirational muse of artists, writers, inventors, scholars and researchers. Luciferianism is a humanistic philosophy. Luciferians seek the betterment of mankind and are on a constant search for more knowledge and wisdom. Some Luciferians are Satanists, but not all because there are many different varieties of Satanists, as well. The relationship between Satan and Lucifer in worldwide history is complicated. Usually, when a group of people regard Luciferian entities as "Satan" it is because they see them as a rival for their monotheistic god. Lucifer is an ancient pre-Christian and pagan spirit who has counterparts in throughout the world. Most Luciferians regard themselves as pagans, although, they are not necessarily neo-pagans. The term "neo-pagan" confuses the matter because Luciferian philosophy does not fit into the paradigm of re-creationist pagan traditions. Many Luciferians avoid applying the term "pagan" to themselves because this often arouses a great deal of anger and hostility among neo-pagans. So forget about sacrifice virgins at midnight, Black Metal and black clothes, is not about to be against Christians or Catholics or GOD. And to think EVIL = Luciferian. If you still thinking it, read the text again. And again. Anyway, i think all religions and every philosophy are good if is not about to start wars, hate, envy, greed and divide people. Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:17:12 -0400 HELEL BEN-SHACHAR http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/helel-ben-shachar-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/helel-ben-shachar-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/433094/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray, kleenex, ashses of cigarettes on canvas. PLEASE LISTEN TO THE SONG READING THE TEXT AND WATCHING THE IMAGE FOR TO CATCH THE VIBE: soundcloud.com/mistertrece/mis… FULL VIEW FOR THE DETAILS, PLEASE!!!!!!! Lucifer ( Hebrew: הֵילֵל, hēlēl, "shining one" Greek: Ἑωσφόρος, Heosphoros, "dawn-bearer"; Latin lucem ferre, "light-bringing") is a term in Christianity, that is applied to the Devil. Lucifer is the Septuagint translation of the Hebrew term "Helel ben Shaḥar" ("the shining one, son of the morning"), in the prophetic vision of Isaiah (14:12-14). The term Lucifer is used in the Vulgate (Latin lucifer, "light-bringing") and is applied to the morning star, Venus seen at dawn; it is also the KJV rendering of the Hebrew word hēlēl. After the name "Lucifer" became synonymous with the Devil in Christian culture, its use outside of the Bible was popularized in works such as Dante Alighieri's Inferno and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Metaphorically, the title Lucifer is applied to Jesus Christ himself. Christians did not first create the concept of 'The Devil', the evil God or the dark Lord. It has been a recurrent theme in other religions albeit usually focussing on the 'destroyer' aspects, as one force of many in nature. Lucifer is just another name for Satan, who as head of the evil world-system is the real, though invisible, power behind the successive rulers of Tyre, Babylon, Persia, Greece, Rome, and all of those evil rulers that we have seen come and go in the history of the world. This passage goes beyond human history and marks the beginning of sin in the universe and the very fall of Satan in the pristine, sinless spheres before the creation of man. Lucifer, Satan and the Devil are three different names for the same angel. Lucifer refers to this angel when he lived in heaven. The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = 'slanderer' or 'accuser') is believed in many religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly. It ranges from being an effective opposite force to the creator god at one extreme, where both are locked in an eons long holy war for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being just a comical figure of fun or even an abstract aspect of the individual human condition at the other. The term appears in the context of an oracle against a dead king of Babylon, who is addressed as הילל בן שחר (hêlêl ben šāḥar),rendered by the King James Version as "O Lucifer, son of the morning!" and by others as "morning star, son of the dawn". Lucifer, the Devil, was the model of perfection ( Ezakiel 28:12): most perfect most wise most intelligent most powerful most knowledgeable Our traditional image of the horned, winged demon comes from the Sumerian Myth of Zu and focuses on the two brother-gods, Enki, who seems to have sympathy for the humans, and Enlil, who is a strict adherent to Anu's orders. SET, OR SETH, whom the Greeks called Typhon, the nefarious demon of death and evil in Egyptian mythology, is characterised as "a strong god (a-pahuti), whose anger is to be feared." The inscriptions call him "the powerful one of Thebes," and "Ruler of the South." He is conceived as the sun that kills with the arrows of heat; he is the slayer, and iron is called the bones of Typhon. The hunted animals are consecrated to him; and his symbols are the griffin (akhekh), the hippopotamus, the crocodile, the swine, the tortoise, and, above all the serpent âpapi (in Greek "apophis") who was thought to await the dying man in the domain of the god Atmu (also called Tmu or Tum), who represents the sun below the western horizon. In Greek mythology, Prometheus (in Ancient Greek meaning "forethought") is a Titan known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals for their use. His myth has been treated by a number of ancient sources, in which Prometheus is credited with (or blamed for) playing a pivotal role in the early history of humankind. Prometheus is associated with technology and science, embodying some qualities of the Theistic Satan. However, Prometheus is not generally worshipping by Theistic Satanists or pagans, but is worshipped by some modern Gnostic Luciferans. Ba'al was a God worshipped in ancient Carthage. The Carthaginians' Baal worship is mentioned in the Old Testament - referred to as 'Baal' and 'Baal-zebub'. The name Ba'al has also been associated with a number of other Gods, including the Roman God, Saturn. There is a book of Beleil in the Satanic Bible (atheistic of course!) which links Ba'al to LaVey Satanism. Theistic Satanism, for example, the Church of Azazel (who define Azazel as Satan), believes Belial (i.e. Beliel, Ba'al) to refer to the down-to-earth and practical side of Satan. Tiamat is often regarded as an 'evil' deity, with Marduk being the 'good' Babylonian deity counterpart. Perhaps in this role, Tiamat represents a Christian interpretation of the Devil. The cult of Marduk existed from approximately 1500 BC. Marduk was associated by the Romans with the planet Jupiter. Enki, the son of Nammu, is the Sumeran deity whose name literally means Lord of the Earth. Enki was later known as Ea in Babylonian mythology. Enki was originally chief god of the city of Eridu. He was the deity of crafts, water, intelligence and creation. He is the champion of mankind. Perhaps there are parallels to the concept of Prometheus or non-Biblical view of) Satan. The demons derived from the minor evil spirits of the Near East, whereas the Devil derives from the Hebrew mal'ak the shadow of the Lord, and the Mazdaist principle of evil itself. The New Testament maintained the distinction by differentiating between the terms diabolos and daimonion, but it was a distinction that was often blurred, and many English translations muddle it further by translating daimonion as 'devil.' . . . By the first century of the Christian era ... evil spirits usually went by the name of daimonia, 'demons.' This Hellenistic classification would lump Satan with the other evil spirits in the category of daimonia. Whilst mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. As such, the Devil is seen as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment. In mainstream Christianity, God and the Devil are usually portrayed as fighting over the souls of humans, with the Devil seeking to lure people away from God and into Hell. The Devil commands a force of evil spirits, commonly known as demons. The Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament) describes the Adversary (Ha-satan) as an angel who instigates tests upon humankind. In the Bible, the Hebraic text in Isaiah 14:2 refers to Helel Ben Shachar or Heylel Ben-Shachar (הילל בן שחר). Helel Ben-Schachar is translated into English as “O shining star, son of the dawn!" The name Lucifer is a translation of Helel Ben-Shachar into Latin. Many other religions have a trickster or tempter figure that is similar to the Devil. Modern conceptions of the Devil include the concept that it symbolizes humans' own lower nature or sinfulness. The concept of Lucifer inspires to dig deeper into life's mysteries to discover the truth about the nature of the world, both physically and metaphysically. To be a Luciferian is to adopt the mental attitude of seeking enlightenment. Lucifer is the inspirational muse of artists, writers, inventors, scholars and researchers. Luciferianism is a humanistic philosophy. Luciferians seek the betterment of mankind and are on a constant search for more knowledge and wisdom. Some Luciferians are Satanists, but not all because there are many different varieties of Satanists, as well. The relationship between Satan and Lucifer in worldwide history is complicated. Usually, when a group of people regard Luciferian entities as "Satan" it is because they see them as a rival for their monotheistic god. People often put the concept of the Devil to use in social and political conflicts, claiming that their opponents are influenced by the Devil or even willingly supporting the Devil. In addition, the Devil has also been used to explain why others hold beliefs that are considered to be false and ungodly. Though there is scant mention of Satan as some supernatural presence in the Old Testament, the New Testament is replete with references to Satan or the devil. "The English 'Devil,' like the German Teufel and the Spanish diablo, derives from the Greek diabolos," writes Russell. "Diabolos means 'slanderer' or a 'perjuror' or an 'adversary' in court.... Although the concept of the Devil--a single personification of evil--does not exist in most religions and philosophies, the problem of evil exists in every world view except that of radical relativism. Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:14:12 -0400 IMAGO MORTIIS http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/imago-mortiis-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/imago-mortiis-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/383728/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Diablo Ink, brush and kleenex on cardboard, 3 coffee, 4 cigarettes. PLEASE LISTEN THE SONG READING THE TEXT AND WATCHING THE IMAGE FOR TO CATCH THE VIBE www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFZ9g9… The fucking nose sucks again. FULL VIEW FOR THE DETAILS, PLEASE!!!! The English word spirit (from Latin spiritus "breath") has many differing meanings and connotations, most of them relating to a non-corporeal substance contrasted with the material body. The word spirit is often used metaphysically to refer to the consciousness or personality. The notions of a person's "spirit" and "soul" often also overlap, as both contrast with body and both are understood as surviving the bodily death in religion and occultism, and "spirit" can also have the sense of "ghost", a manifestation of the spirit of a deceased person. The word "spirit" came into Middle English via Old French. The distinction between soul and spirit also developed in the Abrahamic religions: Arabic nafs (نفس) opposite rúħ (روح); Hebrew neshama (נְשָׁמָה nəšâmâh) or nephesh (in Hebrew neshama comes from the root NŠM or "breath") opposite ruach (רוּחַ rûaħ). In Indo-European, this dichotomy has not always been as neat historically as it has come to be taken over a long period of development: Both נֶ֫פֶשׁ (root נפשׁ) and רוּחַ (root רוח), as well as cognate words in various Semitic languages, including Arabic, also preserve meanings involving air phenomena: "breath", "wind", and even "odour". In metaphysical terms, "spirit" has acquired a number of meanings: - An incorporeal but ubiquitous, non-quantifiable substance or energy present individually in all living things. Unlike the concept of souls (often regarded as eternal and sometimes believed to pre-exist the body) a spirit develops and grows as an integral aspect of a living being. This concept of the individual spirit occurs commonly in animism. Note the distinction between this concept of spirit and that of the pre-existing or eternal soul: belief in souls occurs specifically and far less commonly, particularly in traditional societies. One might more properly term this type/aspect of spirit "life" (bios in Greek) or "aether" rather than "spirit" (pneuma in Greek). - A daemon sprite, or especially a ghost. People usually conceive of a ghost as a wandering spirit from a being no longer living, having survived the death of the body yet maintaining at least vestiges of mind and of consciousness. In religion and spirituality, the respiration of a human has for obvious reasons become seen as strongly linked with the very occurrence of life. A similar significance has become attached to human blood. Spirit, in this sense, means the thing that separates a living body from a corpse—and usually implies intelligence, consciousness, and sentience. - Some Native American spiritual traditions the Great Spirit or Wakan Tanka is a term for the Supreme Being. - Various forms of animism, such as Japan's Shinto and African traditional religion, focus on invisible beings that represent or connect with plants, animals (sometimes called "Animal Fathers)", or landforms (kami) translators usually employ the English word "spirit" when trying to express the idea of such entities. Individual spirits envisaged as interconnected with all other spirits and with "The Spirit" (singular and capitalized). This concept relates to theories of a unified spirituality, to universal consciousness and to some concepts of Deity. In this scenario all separate "spirits", when connected, form a greater unity, the Spirit, which has an identity separate from its elements plus a consciousness and intellect greater than its elements; an ultimate, unified, non-dual awareness or force of life combining or transcending all individual units of consciousness. The experience of such a connection can become a primary basis for spiritual belief. - The term spirit occurs in this sense in (to name but a few) Anthroposophy, Aurobindo, A Course In Miracles, Hegel, Ken Wilber, and Meher Baba (though in his teachings, "spirits" are only apparently separate from each other and from "The Spirit.") In this use, the term seems conceptually identical to Plotinus's "The One" and Friedrich Schelling's "Absolute". Similarly, according to the panentheistic/pantheistic view, Spirit equates to essence that can manifest itself as mind/soul through any level in pantheistic hierarchy/holarchy, such as through a mind/soul of a single cell (with very primitive, elemental consciousness), or through a human or animal mind/soul (with consciousness on a level of organic synergy of an individual human/animal), or through a (superior) mind/soul with synergetically extremely complex/sophisticated consciousness of whole galaxies involving all sub-levels, all emanating (since the superior mind/soul operates non-dimensionally, or trans-dimensionally) from the one Spirit. - Christian theology can use the term "Spirit" to describe God, or aspects of God — as in the "Holy Spirit", referring to a Triune God (Trinity)(cf Gospel of Matthew 28:19). - "Spirit" forms a central concept in pneumatology (note that pneumatology studies "pneuma" (Greek for "spirit") not "psyche" (Greek for "soul") — as studied in psychology). Christian Science uses "Spirit" as one of the seven synonyms for God, as in: "Principle; Mind; Soul; Spirit; Life; Truth; Love. -Harmonism reserves the term "spirit" for those that collectively control and influence an individual from the realm of the mind. - Some languages use a word for "spirit" often closely related (if not synonymous) to "mind". Examples include the German, Geist (related to the English word "ghost") or the French, 'l'esprit'. English versions of the Judaeo-Christian Bible most commonly translate the Hebrew word "ruach" (wind") as "the spirit", whose essence is divine. Alternatively, Hebrew texts commonly use the word nephesh. Kabbalists regard nephesh as one of the five parts of the Jewish soul, where nephesh (animal) refers to the physical being and its animal instincts. Similarly, Scandinavian languages, Baltic languages, Slavic languages and the Chinese language use the words for "breath" to express concepts similar to "the spirit". Wed, 23 Oct 2013 16:56:19 -0400 THEY WERE, THEY ARE, THEY WILL BE http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/they-were-they-are-they-will-be <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/they-were-they-are-they-will-be"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/383727/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray and kleenex on canvas, 2 coffee, 3 cigarette. PLEASE LISTEN TO THIS SONG [link] WATCHING THE IMAGE AND READING THE TEXT FOR TO CATCH THE FEELING, IS THE 25% OF THE PIECE!!!! “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” – H.P. Lovecraft In traditional belief and fiction, a ghost is the soul or spirit of a deceased person or animal that can appear, in visible form or other manifestation, to the living. Descriptions of the apparition of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, life-like visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to appease the spirits of the dead. Ghosts are generally described as solitary essences that haunt particular locations, objects, or people they were associated with in life, though stories of phantom armies, ghost trains, phantom ships, and even ghost animals have also been recounted In many cultures malignant, restless ghosts are distinguished from the more benign spirits involved in ancestor worship. Ancestor worship typically involves rites intended to prevent revenants, vengeful spirits of the dead, imagined as starving and envious of the living. Strategies for preventing revenants may either include sacrifice: giving the dead food and drink to pacify them, or magical banishment of the deceased to force them not to return. Ritual feeding of the dead is performed in traditions like the Chinese Ghost Festival or the Western All Souls' Day. Magical banishment of the dead is present in many of the world's burial customs. The bodies found in many tumuli (kurgan) had been ritually bound before burial, and the custom of binding the dead persists, for example, in rural Anatolia. There are many references to ghosts in Mesopotamian religions - the religions of Sumer, Babylon, Assyria and other early states in Mesopotamia. Traces of these beliefs survive in the later Abrahamic religions that came to dominate the region. Ghosts were thought to be created at time of death, taking on the memory and personality of the dead person. They traveled to the netherworld, where they were assigned a position, and led an existence similar in some ways to that of the living. Relatives of the dead were expected to make offerings of food and drink to the dead to ease their conditions. If they did not, the ghosts could inflict misfortune and illness on the living. Traditional healing practices ascribed a variety of illnesses to the action of ghosts, while others were caused by gods or demons. The Hebrew Bible contains few references to ghosts, associating spiritism with forbidden occult activities cf. Deuteronomy 18:11. The most notable reference is in the First Book of Samuel (I Samuel 28:3-19 KJV), in which a disguised King Saul has the Witch of Endor summon the spirit/ghost of Samuel. There was widespread belief in ghosts in ancient Egyptian culture in the sense of the continued existence of the soul and spirit after death, with the ability to assist or harm the living, and the possibility of a second death. Over a period of more than 2,500 years, Egyptian beliefs about the nature of the afterlife evolved constantly. Many of these beliefs were recorded in inscriptions, papyrus scrolls and tomb paintings. The Egyptian Book of the Dead compiles some of the beliefs from different periods of ancient Egyptian history. By the 5th century BC, classical Greek ghosts had become haunting, frightening creatures who could work to either good or evil purposes. The spirit of the dead was believed to hover near the resting place of the corpse, and cemeteries were places the living avoided. The dead were to be ritually mourned through public ceremony, sacrifice and libations, or they might return to haunt their families. The ancient Greeks held annual feasts to honor and placate the spirits of the dead, to which the family ghosts were invited, and after which they were “firmly invited to leave until the same time next year”. Ghosts reported in medieval Europe tended to fall into two categories: the souls of the dead, or demons. The souls of the dead returned for a specific purpose. Demonic ghosts were those which existed only to torment or tempt the living. The living could tell them apart by demanding their purpose in the name of Jesus Christ. The soul of a dead person would divulge their mission, while a demonic ghost would be banished at the sound of the Holy Name. Renaissance magic took a revived interest in the occult, including necromancy. In the era of the Reformation and Counter Reformation, there was frequently a backlash against unwholesome interest in the dark arts, typified by writers such as Thomas Erastus. The Swiss Reformed pastor Ludwig Lavater supplied one of the most frequently reprinted books of the period with his Of Ghosts and Spirits Walking By Night. According to Islamic teachings, there is no such thing as Ghosts. Muslims believe that 'Ghosts' are in fact jinns. The Koran discusses spirits known as jinn. In Buddhism, there are a number of planes of existence a person into which a person can be reborn, one of which is the realm of hungry ghosts. There are many references to ghosts in Chinese culture. Even Confucius said, "Respect ghosts and gods, but keep away from them." The ghosts take many forms, depending on how the person died, and are often harmful. Many Chinese ghost beliefs have been accepted by neighboring cultures, notably Japan and south-east Asia. Ghost beliefs are closely associated with traditional Chinese religion based on ancestor worship, many of which were incorporated in Taoism. Later beliefs were influenced by Buddhism, and in turn influenced and created uniquely Chinese Buddhist beliefs. Although the human soul was sometimes symbolically or literally depicted in ancient cultures as a bird or other animal, it appears to have been widely held that the soul was an exact reproduction of the body in every feature, even down to clothing the person wore. This is depicted in artwork from various ancient cultures, including such works as the Egyptian Book of the Dead, which shows deceased people in the afterlife appearing much as they did before death, including the style of dress. A place where ghosts are reported is described as haunted, and often seen as being inhabited by spirits of deceased who may have been former residents or were familiar with the property. Supernatural activity inside homes is said to be mainly associated with violent or tragic events in the building's past such as murder, accidental death, or suicide — sometimes in the recent or ancient past. But not all hauntings are at a place of a violent death, or even on violent grounds. Many cultures and religions believe the essence of a being, such as the 'soul', continues to exist. Some philosophical and religious views argue that the 'spirits' of those who have died have not 'passed over' and are trapped inside the property where their memories and energy are strong. Wed, 23 Oct 2013 16:53:59 -0400 VITA ULTRA MORTIS http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/vita-ultra-mortis-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/vita-ultra-mortis-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/383726/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray, kleenex and brush on canvas, 3 coffee, 2 cigarettes. PLEASE LISTEN TO THIS SONG WATCHING THE IMAGE AND READING THE TEXT FOR TO CATCH THE FEELING www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYB3yy… The fucking eyes SUCK... again. Deities associated with death take many different forms, depending on the specific culture and religion being referenced. Psychopomps, deities of the underworld, and resurrection deities are commonly called death deities in comparative religions texts. The term colloquially refers to deities that either collect or rule over the dead, rather than those deities who determine the time of death.Many have incorporated a god of death into their mythology or religion. As death, along with birth, is among the major parts of human life, these deities may often be one of the most important deities of a religion. In some religions with a single powerful deity as the source of worship, the death deity is an antagonistic deity against which the primary deity struggles. The related term death worship has most often been used as a derogatory term to accuse certain groups of morally abhorrent practices which set no value on human life, or which seem to glorify death as something positive in itself.Psychopomps (from the Greek word ψυχοπομπός - psuchopompos, literally meaning the "guide of souls") are creatures, spirits, angels, or deities in many religions whose responsibility is to escort newly deceased souls to the afterlife. Their role is not to judge the deceased, but simply provide safe passage. Frequently depicted on funerary art, psychopomps have been associated at different times and in different cultures with horses, Whip-poor-wills, ravens, dogs, crows, owls, sparrows, cuckoos, and harts.In Jungian psychology, the psychopomp is a mediator between the unconscious and conscious realms. It is symbolically personified in dreams as a wise man or woman, or sometimes as a helpful animal. In many cultures, the shaman also fulfills the role of the psychopomp. This may include not only accompanying the soul of the dead, but also vice versa: to help at birth, to introduce the newborn child's soul to the world. This also accounts for the contemporary title of "midwife to the dying," which is another form of psychopomp work. Wed, 23 Oct 2013 16:52:18 -0400 A DARKNES IS LIVING IN YOUR ROOM http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/a-darknes-is-living-in-your-room <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/a-darknes-is-living-in-your-room"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/347105/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aersol spray and kleenex on canvas, 2 coffee, 3 cigarette. “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” – H.P. Lovecraft In traditional belief and fiction, a ghost is the soul or spirit of a deceased person or animal that can appear, in visible form or other manifestation, to the living. Descriptions of the apparition of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, life-like visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to appease the spirits of the dead. Ghosts are generally described as solitary essences that haunt particular locations, objects, or people they were associated with in life, though stories of phantom armies, ghost trains, phantom ships, and even ghost animals have also been recounted In many cultures malignant, restless ghosts are distinguished from the more benign spirits involved in ancestor worship. Ancestor worship typically involves rites intended to prevent revenants, vengeful spirits of the dead, imagined as starving and envious of the living. Strategies for preventing revenants may either include sacrifice: giving the dead food and drink to pacify them, or magical banishment of the deceased to force them not to return. Ritual feeding of the dead is performed in traditions like the Chinese Ghost Festival or the Western All Souls' Day. Magical banishment of the dead is present in many of the world's burial customs. The bodies found in many tumuli (kurgan) had been ritually bound before burial, and the custom of binding the dead persists, for example, in rural Anatolia. There are many references to ghosts in Mesopotamian religions - the religions of Sumer, Babylon, Assyria and other early states in Mesopotamia. Traces of these beliefs survive in the later Abrahamic religions that came to dominate the region. Ghosts were thought to be created at time of death, taking on the memory and personality of the dead person. They traveled to the netherworld, where they were assigned a position, and led an existence similar in some ways to that of the living. Relatives of the dead were expected to make offerings of food and drink to the dead to ease their conditions. If they did not, the ghosts could inflict misfortune and illness on the living. Traditional healing practices ascribed a variety of illnesses to the action of ghosts, while others were caused by gods or demons. The Hebrew Bible contains few references to ghosts, associating spiritism with forbidden occult activities cf. Deuteronomy 18:11. The most notable reference is in the First Book of Samuel (I Samuel 28:3-19 KJV), in which a disguised King Saul has the Witch of Endor summon the spirit/ghost of Samuel. There was widespread belief in ghosts in ancient Egyptian culture in the sense of the continued existence of the soul and spirit after death, with the ability to assist or harm the living, and the possibility of a second death. Over a period of more than 2,500 years, Egyptian beliefs about the nature of the afterlife evolved constantly. Many of these beliefs were recorded in inscriptions, papyrus scrolls and tomb paintings. The Egyptian Book of the Dead compiles some of the beliefs from different periods of ancient Egyptian history. By the 5th century BC, classical Greek ghosts had become haunting, frightening creatures who could work to either good or evil purposes. The spirit of the dead was believed to hover near the resting place of the corpse, and cemeteries were places the living avoided. The dead were to be ritually mourned through public ceremony, sacrifice and libations, or they might return to haunt their families. The ancient Greeks held annual feasts to honor and placate the spirits of the dead, to which the family ghosts were invited, and after which they were “firmly invited to leave until the same time next year”. Ghosts reported in medieval Europe tended to fall into two categories: the souls of the dead, or demons. The souls of the dead returned for a specific purpose. Demonic ghosts were those which existed only to torment or tempt the living. The living could tell them apart by demanding their purpose in the name of Jesus Christ. The soul of a dead person would divulge their mission, while a demonic ghost would be banished at the sound of the Holy Name. Renaissance magic took a revived interest in the occult, including necromancy. In the era of the Reformation and Counter Reformation, there was frequently a backlash against unwholesome interest in the dark arts, typified by writers such as Thomas Erastus. The Swiss Reformed pastor Ludwig Lavater supplied one of the most frequently reprinted books of the period with his Of Ghosts and Spirits Walking By Night. According to Islamic teachings, there is no such thing as Ghosts. Muslims believe that 'Ghosts' are in fact jinns. The Koran discusses spirits known as jinn. In Buddhism, there are a number of planes of existence a person into which a person can be reborn, one of which is the realm of hungry ghosts. There are many references to ghosts in Chinese culture. Even Confucius said, "Respect ghosts and gods, but keep away from them." The ghosts take many forms, depending on how the person died, and are often harmful. Many Chinese ghost beliefs have been accepted by neighboring cultures, notably Japan and south-east Asia. Ghost beliefs are closely associated with traditional Chinese religion based on ancestor worship, many of which were incorporated in Taoism. Later beliefs were influenced by Buddhism, and in turn influenced and created uniquely Chinese Buddhist beliefs. Although the human soul was sometimes symbolically or literally depicted in ancient cultures as a bird or other animal, it appears to have been widely held that the soul was an exact reproduction of the body in every feature, even down to clothing the person wore. This is depicted in artwork from various ancient cultures, including such works as the Egyptian Book of the Dead, which shows deceased people in the afterlife appearing much as they did before death, including the style of dress. A place where ghosts are reported is described as haunted, and often seen as being inhabited by spirits of deceased who may have been former residents or were familiar with the property. Supernatural activity inside homes is said to be mainly associated with violent or tragic events in the building's past such as murder, accidental death, or suicide — sometimes in the recent or ancient past. But not all hauntings are at a place of a violent death, or even on violent grounds. Many cultures and religions believe the essence of a being, such as the 'soul', continues to exist. Some philosophical and religious views argue that the 'spirits' of those who have died have not 'passed over' and are trapped inside the property where their memories and energy are strong. Thu, 13 Jun 2013 15:51:36 -0400 DER GEIST http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/der-geist-2 <a href="http://shadowness.com/MISTERTRECE/der-geist-2"><img src="http://shadowness.com/file/item9/347104/image_t6.jpg" /></a><br />Aerosol spray and kleenex on cavas, 3 coffee, 2 cigarette. The English word spirit (from Latin spiritus "breath") has many differing meanings and connotations, most of them relating to a non-corporeal substance contrasted with the material body. The word spirit is often used metaphysically to refer to the consciousness or personality. The notions of a person's "spirit" and "soul" often also overlap, as both contrast with body and both are understood as surviving the bodily death in religion and occultism, and "spirit" can also have the sense of "ghost", a manifestation of the spirit of a deceased person. The word "spirit" came into Middle English via Old French. The distinction between soul and spirit also developed in the Abrahamic religions: Arabic nafs (نفس) opposite rúħ (روح); Hebrew neshama (נְשָׁמָה nəšâmâh) or nephesh (in Hebrew neshama comes from the root NŠM or "breath") opposite ruach (רוּחַ rûaħ). In Indo-European, this dichotomy has not always been as neat historically as it has come to be taken over a long period of development: Both נֶ֫פֶשׁ (root נפשׁ) and רוּחַ (root רוח), as well as cognate words in various Semitic languages, including Arabic, also preserve meanings involving air phenomena: "breath", "wind", and even "odour". In metaphysical terms, "spirit" has acquired a number of meanings: - An incorporeal but ubiquitous, non-quantifiable substance or energy present individually in all living things. Unlike the concept of souls (often regarded as eternal and sometimes believed to pre-exist the body) a spirit develops and grows as an integral aspect of a living being. This concept of the individual spirit occurs commonly in animism. Note the distinction between this concept of spirit and that of the pre-existing or eternal soul: belief in souls occurs specifically and far less commonly, particularly in traditional societies. One might more properly term this type/aspect of spirit "life" (bios in Greek) or "aether" rather than "spirit" (pneuma in Greek). - A daemon sprite, or especially a ghost. People usually conceive of a ghost as a wandering spirit from a being no longer living, having survived the death of the body yet maintaining at least vestiges of mind and of consciousness. In religion and spirituality, the respiration of a human has for obvious reasons become seen as strongly linked with the very occurrence of life. A similar significance has become attached to human blood. Spirit, in this sense, means the thing that separates a living body from a corpse—and usually implies intelligence, consciousness, and sentience. - Some Native American spiritual traditions the Great Spirit or Wakan Tanka is a term for the Supreme Being. - Various forms of animism, such as Japan's Shinto and African traditional religion, focus on invisible beings that represent or connect with plants, animals (sometimes called "Animal Fathers)", or landforms (kami) translators usually employ the English word "spirit" when trying to express the idea of such entities. Individual spirits envisaged as interconnected with all other spirits and with "The Spirit" (singular and capitalized). This concept relates to theories of a unified spirituality, to universal consciousness and to some concepts of Deity. In this scenario all separate "spirits", when connected, form a greater unity, the Spirit, which has an identity separate from its elements plus a consciousness and intellect greater than its elements; an ultimate, unified, non-dual awareness or force of life combining or transcending all individual units of consciousness. The experience of such a connection can become a primary basis for spiritual belief. - The term spirit occurs in this sense in (to name but a few) Anthroposophy, Aurobindo, A Course In Miracles, Hegel, Ken Wilber, and Meher Baba (though in his teachings, "spirits" are only apparently separate from each other and from "The Spirit.") In this use, the term seems conceptually identical to Plotinus's "The One" and Friedrich Schelling's "Absolute". Similarly, according to the panentheistic/pantheistic view, Spirit equates to essence that can manifest itself as mind/soul through any level in pantheistic hierarchy/holarchy, such as through a mind/soul of a single cell (with very primitive, elemental consciousness), or through a human or animal mind/soul (with consciousness on a level of organic synergy of an individual human/animal), or through a (superior) mind/soul with synergetically extremely complex/sophisticated consciousness of whole galaxies involving all sub-levels, all emanating (since the superior mind/soul operates non-dimensionally, or trans-dimensionally) from the one Spirit. - Christian theology can use the term "Spirit" to describe God, or aspects of God — as in the "Holy Spirit", referring to a Triune God (Trinity)(cf Gospel of Matthew 28:19). - "Spirit" forms a central concept in pneumatology (note that pneumatology studies "pneuma" (Greek for "spirit") not "psyche" (Greek for "soul") — as studied in psychology). Christian Science uses "Spirit" as one of the seven synonyms for God, as in: "Principle; Mind; Soul; Spirit; Life; Truth; Love. -Harmonism reserves the term "spirit" for those that collectively control and influence an individual from the realm of the mind. - Some languages use a word for "spirit" often closely related (if not synonymous) to "mind". Examples include the German, Geist (related to the English word "ghost") or the French, 'l'esprit'. English versions of the Judaeo-Christian Bible most commonly translate the Hebrew word "ruach" (wind") as "the spirit", whose essence is divine. Alternatively, Hebrew texts commonly use the word nephesh. Kabbalists regard nephesh as one of the five parts of the Jewish soul, where nephesh (animal) refers to the physical being and its animal instincts. Similarly, Scandinavian languages, Baltic languages, Slavic languages and the Chinese language use the words for "breath" to express concepts similar to "the spirit". Thu, 13 Jun 2013 15:49:50 -0400